In Appreciation — November 2010

November 30, 2010
300px Giraffe auckland zoo In Appreciation    November 2010

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This is the end of my fourth month of blogging.  At the end of each month, I try to give thanks to those who have given me great support or even a boost as I try to develop my practice.

For Thanksgiving this year, my wife, two kids and I went to Philadelphia to see my mother and her boyfriend.  Unfortunately, my sisters were elsewhere due to the needs of others in our now extended family, so it was just the six of us.

My mother has been in steadily declining health over the last four or five years.  She is now permanently bound to a wheelchair and also cannot speak in any more than a rhythmic stutter with the occasional English word thrown in here or there.  At least a dozen doctors have seen her through this time, but none can conclusively determine what she has.  Alzheimers?  Parkinsons?  Cordicobasal degeneration?  Does it really matter?

The even greater tragedy is that she is well aware of what is going on.  She has lived a very healthy life; she watched what she ate, exercised, and always kept moving and doing.  As a result, her heart, circulation, and other systems are doing much better than normal.  So ironically, due to her good living, she is likely to survive for years in her current state.

Mom was excited when I started this blog a few months ago.  While she couldn’t directly say so, she seemed to be proud and interested whenever I showed my site to her.  I decided to show it to her right before the Thanksgiving meal; probably for the quick ego boost one usually gets from experiencing parental approval.

She looked at the computer screen for a couple of seconds, but then looked out the window and began her cadenced chants.  She looked at her boyfriend, my kids, the food, smiling, talking.  I tried to show her another page, but she looked back out of the window and began to speak to her reflection.  I smiled at her, closed my laptop, gave her a hug, and began to talk to the reflection as well.

My deepest appreciation to the following people:

Dr. Murray C. Soss, D.O. – My mother’s boyfriend, a family doctor, is living with Mom.  I cannot imagine the pain he must be suffering watching the daily decline, but he does not complain one iota.  To me, he is what doctoring should be all about.  He has maintained his practice in the same declining location for over 40 years, while most others fled to the suburbs.  He regularly updates us and gently reminds us how much Mom enjoys our visits.  He has also been like a father to me.  Thank you, Murray.

Hani Sarji – Here’s an interesting sidebar.  Before I went up to Philly, I wrote here about the six levels of estate planning services.  While I was away, Mr. Sarji, the fine blogger at forbes.com that I refer to often, wrote a complimentary post in his blog about my article.

From almost the second he published his post, visits to my site have increased exponentially.  In the four days since he posted, my site is being viewed at literally more than 10 times its usual daily average.  Heck, it’s not even 11am yet today on the fifth day, and my site already has exceeded the usual number of daily visits.

I’m not necessarily a spiritual guy, but it’s fun to think that maybe somehow Mom had a part in this.  My cup runneth over.  In any event, thank you again, Mr. Sarji.  Your timing is impeccable, and your reach goes much further than you even know.

Andrea, Benjamin and Samantha Zucker – My wonderful wife and kids.

Carl K. Zucker (1934-2002).

Syma Zucker – Mom.

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This is the end of my fourth month of blogging. At the end of each month, I try to give thanks to those who have given me great support or even a boost as I try to develop my practice.

For Thanksgiving this year, my wife, two kids and I went to Philadelphia to see my mother and her boyfriend. Unfortunately, my sisters were elsewhere due to the needs of others in our now extended family, so it was just the six of us.

My mother has been in steadily declining health over the last four or five years. She is now permanently bound to a wheelchair and also cannot speak in any more than a rhythmic stutter with the occasional English word thrown in here or there. At least a dozen doctors have seen her through this time, but none can conclusively determine what she has. Alzheimers? Parkinsons? Cordicobasal degeneration? Does it really matter?

The even greater tragedy is that she is well aware of what is going on. She has lived a very healthy life; she watched what she ate, exercised, and always kept moving and doing. As a result, her heart, circulation, and other systems are doing much better than normal. So ironically, due to her good living, she is likely to survive for years in her current state.

Mom was excited when I started this blog a few months ago. While she couldn’t directly say so, she seemed to be proud and interested whenever I showed my site to her. I decided to show it to her right before the Thanksgiving meal; probably for the quick ego boost one usually gets from experiencing parental approval.

She looked at the computer screen for a couple of seconds, but then looked out the window and began her cadenced chants. She looked at her boyfriend, my kids, the food, smiling, talking. I tried to show her another page, but she looked back out of the window and began to speak to her reflection. I smiled at her, closed my laptop, gave her a hug, and began to talk to the reflection as well.

My deepest appreciation to the following people:

Dr. Murray Soss – My mother’s boyfriend, a doctor, is also a general practitioner who lives with Mom. I cannot imagine the pain he must be suffering watching the daily decline, but he does not complain one iota. To me, he is what doctoring should be all about. He has maintained his practice in the same declining location for over 40 years, while most others fled to the suburbs. He regularly updates us and gently reminds us how much Mom enjoys our visits. He has also been like a father to me. Thank you, Murray.

Hani Sarji – Before I went up to Philly, I wrote here about the six levels of estate planning services. While I was away, Mr. Sarji, the fine blogger at forbes.com, wrote a complimentary post in his blog about my article.

From almost the second he published his post, visits to my site have increased exponentially. In the four days since he posted, my site is being viewed literally more than 10 times its usual daily average. Heck, it’s not even 11am yet today on the fifth day, and my site already has exceeded the usual number of daily visits.

I’m not necessarily a spiritual guy, but it’s fun to think that maybe somehow Mom did have a part in all this. My cup runneth over. In any event, thank you again, Mr. Sarji. Your reach goes much further than you even know.

Andrea, Benjamin and Samantha Zucker – My wonderful wife and kids.

Carl K. Zucker (1934-2002).

Syma Zucker – Mom.

 In Appreciation    November 2010
 In Appreciation    November 2010

Scott

Scott R. Zucker, Esq. is the owner of The Zucker Law Firm PLLC, located just outside the Capital Beltway in Annandale, within five miles of the City of Fairfax, the county seat of beautiful Fairfax County, Virginia. The firm focuses mainly on estate planning services for Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania clientele, and seeks to do so in an affordable and approachable way. People interested in learning more can contact Scott by phone or email.

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