A-B Trusts

A common use of the Credit Shelter Trust and the Marital Deduction to help save estate taxes.

Disclaimers: When Rejecting an Inheritance is Actually Beneficial

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For 2012 only, anyone who dies with less than $5.12 million will not owe any federal estate tax.  This protection is presently set to decrease to $1 million on January 1, 2013.  While few believe that lawmakers won’t increase this amount before the end of the year, anything is still possible.  Read more...

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Last Week in Estate Planning (September 11 to September 17, 2011)

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This past April top estate planning blogger David A. Shulman, Esq. opined that “[t]he #1 Estate Planning blog is and continues to be Texas Tech Univ. School of Law Professor Gerry Beyer’s ‘Wills, Trusts & Estates Prof Blog.’  It is, and continues to be, essential reading for anyone in the profession.”  Read more...

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1600 Words about a 100-Word Addition to Virginia Trust Law (Part III)

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In the first two parts of this topic, we covered the attempt to unify trust law throughout the United States and Virginia’s brief new amendment to its version of the Uniform Trust Code.  Now, to close the loop, we conclude by giving further detail to two important types of marital deduction trusts briefly mentioned in…

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Ownership, Beneficiaries and Disclaimers in Estate Planning

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Today, we will again discuss how drafting wills and trusts are sometimes only part of the recommended strategy towards avoiding estate taxes.  Close inspection of your asset ownership, the naming of beneficiaries, and proper drafting of your estate documents are essential towards a complete estate plan. We discussed the mechanics of the A-B Trust plan…

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A Common Estate Tax Reduction Strategy

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Much of the motivation behind many estate planning strategies is to simply avoid as much in estate taxes as possible.  We only have a couple months left of freedom from federal estate taxes, as they are pretty much assured to return in some form by January 1, 2011.  Read more...

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