Special Circumstances

While many think they just need a will, many differing situations result in extra planning needs. For instance, a divorce, special needs, and non-traditional relationships tend to require additional consideration in your estate plan.

Expecting Soon? Estate Planning Issues You Should Consider

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Image via Wikipedia For some reason, I am friendly with lots of women.  Perhaps it is due to the influence of my tough mother and two strong older sisters, or that I followed Benjamin Franklin’s advice to marry someone smarter than me.  However, this does not mean that I fully understand how women function.  Read…

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Latest Simpsons Episode Raises Concerns About Burns’ Estate Plan

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The first three minutes of the latest episode of The Simpsons, “Flaming Moe“, introduced a slew of interesting estate planning themes.  Spoiler alert: I reveal here these three minutes of the plot, which is then relegated to barely an afterthought for the remainder of the episode.  Read more...

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The Elizabeth Edwards Estate: Will John Truly Be Disinherited?

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Making the rounds in the news lately is the fact that Elizabeth Edwards, who passed away this past December 7, has seemingly disinherited former Presidential candidate and husband John Edwards by not including him in her will.  Inside Edition has released the will, signed six days before Ms. Edwards’ death.  Read more...

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Why All Parents Need Temporary Guardianship and Emergency Planning

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What will happen to your kids, elderly parents or other dependents if some emergency situation arose?  Does your estate plan cover these situations? As we have discussed in many posts, estate planning is not limited to passing your property after death.  We have often referred to Ancillary Documents such as “Durable Powers of Attorney”, “Advance…

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Digital Assets: Estate Planning for Online Accounts Becoming Essential (Part II)

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Today, we’ll continue our discussion on digital assets (see part I here) by reviewing the current state of the law, including the enforceability of the “Terms of Service” we all click on before opening an online account. Categories of Property First, let’s discuss the broad ways that the law defines different kinds of property before…

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5 Estate Planning Ideas for Cliff Lee (& Other Pro Athletes)

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I am a life-long Phillies fan.  Imagine my pure delight when I heard that on Monday, elite pitcher Cliff Lee signed a 5-year, $120 million deal (plus a potential 6th if he reaches certain goals) with my phavorite team to help shepherd in a new era of excellence.  For more information, type “Cliff Lee” into…

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Digital Assets: Estate Planning for Online Accounts Becoming Essential (Part I)

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If you are the only person who has access to your online accounts, then what happens when you die?  When you open an account online, you usually have to first accept the company’s “Terms of Service” on a take it or leave it basis.  These terms usually provide that the company will maintain some level…

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Estate Planning Movie Review: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part I

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As we all know, many films do not take the time to peruse the estate planning effects caused by its characters and events.  I found that “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part I”, released Friday, was a fine exception.  In fact, it was the earliest that a film introduced estate planning topics since “Death…

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Last-Minute Estate Planning Can Lead to Chaos

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I had the misfortune of hearing a dreadful story over the weekend.  It is a fine example of how emotions can run quite high in the weeks leading to death if no estate plan is established, and how the survivors are left to solve complex issues that will have an impact for generations.  Read more...

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“Do I Need a New Will if I Move to Another State?”

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Generally, if a will is valid in one state, it will be valid in the next state.  However, if your state laws differ in the areas discussed below, a revision or a completely new will is likely warranted. Proving Your Will Your personal representative will have to prove the validity of your will to the…

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